Cork Nature Network runs a number of long term and short term projects. Further details about these projects can be seen below.

By Eve Moore

Effective communication is critical for raising awareness of climate change and inspiring action. This communication can range from a simple conversation to a seminar, however, regardless of scale, any conversation that occurs around climate change is important. One method of climate change communication that is particularly effective, and also serves as a creative outlet, is the communication that occurs through art and culture.

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The rocky shore ecosystem is a wonderful example of how many layers of sub-habitats can intertwine with each other but differ fundamentally, whilst still sharing close proximity to one another. Various environmental pressures such as salinity, water, wind and oxygen play the master roles here in determining where organisms dwell and build communities.

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The Eurasian otter is a semiaquatic mammal that belongs to the Mustelidae family of carnivorous mammals; along with ferrets, badgers and wolverines. Also known as the European otter, Eurasian river otter, Old World otter, and the elusive common otter. It is native to Eurasia and is the most widely distributed of all thirteen otter species.

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Beaumont quarry is a unique natural location within Cork city.

It is an old abandoned limestone quarry that lies adjacent to Pairc Uí Rinn and Temple Hill, just southeast of the city centre. Not only is it an important place for recreation, it is also very important for local biodiversity and wildlife conservation. Given its close proximity to the city, Beaumont quarry is a haven for Cork’s urban wildlife.

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Cork Nature Network is committed to protecting Ireland’s wildlife through education, research and conservation. For this reason, CNN has engaged in a long-term project to study and protect Ireland’s otter population.

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