Cork Nature Network runs a number of long term and short term projects. Further details about these projects can be seen below.


Hoverfly larvae are about as pretty as any other maggot, but grow into important pollinators and members of our ecosystems, as well as accomplished mimics of bees and wasps.

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Sphagnum mosses are plants that you might easily overlook as you squelch through our bogs. They are star players in the creation and persistence of these wetland though, thanks to their ability to retain water. They provide habitats and soil conditions for a wide variety of wildlife and are part of the vital carbon storage system that Irish bogs provide.

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Ireland hosts five species of tern, migratory seabirds which breed on our coasts and inland lakes in the summer months before migrating to warmer climes in the winter. The roseate tern breeds in huge numbers on Rockabill Island, where the colony is vitally important to the species’ European population as a whole. Climate change and invasive species threaten our terns, but work is ongoing to protect them and ensure their breeding success.

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wildlife image of a wood mouse eating nuts
The Wood Mouse

Did you know that Ireland is home to several wildlife rodent species including the little wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus)? Due to its long tail it is often referred to as the ‘long tail field mouse’ and this is where its Irish name ‘Luch Féir’ comes from. They are on average 8-10cm in length and weigh a tiny 25 grams…that is about 5 sugar cubes!

The wood mouse is often mistaken for the common house mouse, although the wood mouse has some distinguishing features including its large eyes, ears, and a much longer tail.

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Cork Nature Network have some great tips on how you can help biodiversity from your own back garden. Never underestimate how much you can contribute with a few simple changes. Today we look at how you can give garden birds a helping hand.

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