Cork Nature Network runs a number of long term and short term projects. Further details about these projects can be seen below.

Beaumont quarry is a unique natural location within Cork city.

It is an old abandoned limestone quarry that lies adjacent to Pairc Uí Rinn and Temple Hill, just southeast of the city centre. Not only is it an important place for recreation, it is also very important for local biodiversity and wildlife conservation. Given its close proximity to the city, Beaumont quarry is a haven for Cork’s urban wildlife.

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Cork Nature Network is committed to protecting Ireland’s wildlife through education, research and conservation. For this reason, CNN has engaged in a long-term project to study and protect Ireland’s otter population.

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Cork Nature Network has developped a number of walks to encourage outdoor activity, and learning about our amazing wildlife!

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Overview

Located just 3 kilometres from the city centre, Tramore Valley park is Cork cities largest park at 150 acres and boasts an impressive array of walks, such as the 2.5 km Robert Hernan walk and sports ground, including the only international standard BMX Track in cork.

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Overview

The Glen River Park is situated in a deep steep-sided glacial valley on the north side of the City, just off the North Ring Road. Once the place of Goulding’s factory in the 1850s, the site was donated to the people of Cork in the late 1960s and has since been repurposed, in part, as the Glen River amenity park.

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Vernon Mount, locally referred to as the Bog or Bog Vernon is located in west Douglas, just south of the South Ring Road (N40). This site covers approximately 160,000 m2 and is the demesne of the original Vernon Mount house built in the 1700s. This area consists of a broad-leaved wooded valley to the east and some sparsely vegetated grassland to the west.

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Parkowen, formally St. John’s cemetery, is located just off of Quaker Road on the south side of Douglas Street. Also known as St. John’s Park, this grassland habitat is afforded protection as a heritage site and has since been repurposed as a public amenity. Once neglected, this park has since been rewilded to its natural state as part of the Green Spaces for Health project, carried out by Cork City Council with advice from Cork Nature Network.

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OverviewThis trail follows the River Lee from Christ Ring Bridge, on the banks of the lee walkway down to Fitzgerald Park. Otters can be spotted along this route at dawn and dusk. Cork Nature Network have a series of signs describing the diet, habitat, and life of otters along the route. Find out more about the Otter project.

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